"You Are Doing It"

The Second Person Singular Verb Form

Rvfo Cusē (January) 2003

 1

Tvlofvn vyetskes.

You go to town.

2

Wewvn esketskes.

You drink water. (also Owv or Uewv for water)

3

Kafen feketskes.

You pay for coffee.

4

Kafen hayetskes.

You make coffee.

5

Efvn hecetskes.

You see a dog. (or: the dog)

6

Vcen hompetskes.

You eat corn.

7

Naken hotcetskes.

You write things. You write stuff.

8

Cukon v-hueretskes.

You stand by the house.

9

Eton oh-hvlketskes.

You crawl to the tree. (in direction of, toward)

10

Hoktēn kerretskes.

You know the woman. You know her.

11

Pvfnëntketskes.

You run fast (swiftly or quickly).

 

 

(Pvfnē modifies the verb--it explains "how")

12

Tvk-licetskes.

You place it on the ground (purposeful act).

13

Caton oh-liketskes.

You sit upon a rock. (on the rock)

14

Kafkon maketskes.

You say to the flea….

15

Yekcēn mekusvpetskes.

You pray hard. (yekcēn is a modifier--an adverb)

16

Efvn mahvyetskes.

You teach the dog.

17

Tvkliken nesetskes.

You buy bread.

18

Caton noricetskes.

You cook the rock. (or rocks)

19

Corakkon ohliketskes.

You ride a horse. (also Rakko or Co for horse)

20

Hoktvcen oh-onayetskes.

You read to the girl. (or: read to her)

21

Ak-hvsēn ak-omiyetskes.

You swim in the pond. (or small lake)

22

Este-catēt ometskes.

You are Indian (ometskes = este-catë)

23

Hunvnwvn pohetskes.

You hear the man. (or: a man, or "him" in English)

24

Opunvkvn spvlketskes.

You spell the word. (or: as spelkis)

25

pen svtohketskes.

You drive the jeep.

26

Tvmkekotetskes.

You do not fly (implies physical act).

27

Vpohkvn vpohetskes.

You ask a question.

28

Tribeken vtotketskes.

You work for the tribe. (-ke- makes words fit Creek)

29

Oh-tupvn oh-wakketskes.

You lie on the bed. (the top of)

30

Yvhiketvn yvhiketskes.

You sing a song.

31

Cukon oh-yvkvpetskes.

You walk toward the house.

 

"YOU," the second person singular, are the subject of each sentence above. "YOU" is a separate pronoun in English but is embedded in the Creek verb ending "-etskes."  The final "-s" merely marks verbs in declarative sentences with a sense of finality. Declarative sentences are those that declare something or make a statement. If a sentence asks a question (an interrogative sentence --think interrogation here), the verb would end with a vowel such "v" or "e" and occasionally "o." Creek verbs give you much more specific information in less time and space than do most English verbs. Thus, the color green for verb endings because verbs are the "engines" of any Creek sentence--they make the sentence "GO."

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