Let's Meet Those Verbs, Again!

Updated January, 2003

(The "ē" with a long mark over it may show up as an "ė" with two dots over it on some computers. Use Times New Roman font set with extended Latin character set. The downloadable Creek Font set is no longer useful on most recent computers and is being replaced.

Verbs are the engines of a Mvskokē sentence. They make it go! As we have just seen in the previous lesson, in Mvskokē, you can have sentences without separately represented subjects or separately represented objects, direct objects or many other parts--but "you gotta have verbs." In their raw naked form, (found in a dictionary) verbs are given in their "infinitive" role. The infinitive form merely means "to do" whatever the verb is; nothing more.

 

Hompetv

 

"To eat," a generalized term

Liketv

 

"To sit." Also, it may mean to reside, to live, dwell or merely "to be" or "to be located" in some particular place. Context makes the proper meaning known.

Hecetv

 

"To see." It may also mean "to view," "to observe

Lētketv

 

"To run," one person or thing only.

Ometv

 

"To be," a generalized auxiliary or "helping" verb.

Pohetv

 

"To hear, " a generalized term.

Ayetv (or Vyetv)

 

"To go," one person or thing only "to go."

Now, let's do some colour magic with verbs. We'll use green, the colour that represents "to go" when driving to show the active replaceable parts of the verb. Black with be the colour of the verb root/stem, the part that doesn't change.

Hompetv

 

"To eat," a generalized term.

Liketv

 

"To sit," one person or thing only

Hecetv

 

"To see."

Lētketv

 

"To run," one person or thing only.

Ometv

 

"To be," a generalized auxiliary or "helping" verb.

Pohetv

 

"To hear."

Ayetv (Vyetv)

 

"To go," one person or thing only

The infinitive form does nothing in particular but indicate or name the action. It just says "to do," or "to be" whatever the verb is. English makes some additions to verb endings but generally relies on adding additional words for clarity to let you know whom and how many are "doing" the verb. Of course, English often changes the vowel in a verb and occasionally changes the whole darn word such as in "see, saw, seen" and "go, went, gone" to indicate the "tense" or "timing" involved. Mvskokē, on the other hand, uses very specific endings to tell you exactly who is "doing" the verb and precisely when it is being "done," "was done" or "will be" accomplished. You may rely on the regularity of these endings far more often than in English for specific and precise information about "person" (the one doing it) and "tense" (just when is occurs or occurred). By the way, do you know where verbs go in a Mvskokē sentence? Usually at the end!

Let's look at OMETV (Ometv), the verb "to be, exist or be the agent of" something. It is used as the main helping verb and its endings are often attached directly to a verb root.

OMETV - "To Be"

Omis

I am

Omēs or Omēyes

we are

Ometskes

you are

Omatskes

you all are

Omes *

is (she, he or it)

Omakes

they are

 

*Omes is often contracted (or reduced) to just "os."

Look at these endings unattached to a verb--they are important to know right away. Think of them as "sound markers" telling you "WHO" is "doing" the verb at the present time. English uses the addition of several words to "do" the same thing--explain who, whom and when.

--is.

I

--ēs, or ēyes.

We

--etskes.

you (singular)

--atskes.

you (plural)

--es.

she, he or it

--akes.

They

Did you note that the pronouns are BUILT into these "sound markers." They always

Reflect the subject of the sentence. Even if the subject appears as a separate word at the beginning of the sentence, it will still be reflected as a pronoun in the verb. Finally, did you also notice that all the verb endings met so far terminate with an "s?" S is the final or terminal verb marker for declarative sentences--sentences that make a statement of some kind.

For a first verb, we choose HECETV - "To see."

Pack up the infinitive ending "-etv" and send it off to sulk somewhere alone. This leaves us only the root HEC-. To this root, hec-, attach the endings from "ometv."

Hecis.

I see.

Hecēs.

We see.

Hecetskes.

You see.

Hecatskes.

You all see.

Heces.

She sees.

Hecakes.

They see.

 

This pattern works with most Mvskokē verbs. We call these TYPE ONE (1) VERBS.

They all mean "to do" some action or activity. If you guessed there must be a TYPE TWO (2) VERB, you are certainly correct. They work differently, are easier, and all mean not "to do" the action or activity but "to be" in some state of being such as "to be tired," "to be hungry" or "to be thirsty." More about those later. Let's go back to TYPE 1 verbs and explore "to hear," POHETV, the see if it works the same way HECETV does.

Pohis.

I hear.

Pohēs, or Pohēyes.

We hear.

Pohetskes.

You hear.

Pohatskes.

You all hear.

Pohes.

She (he) hears.

Pohakes.

They hear.

 Finally, let's examine a trick verb, "to sit" - LIKETV.

Likis.

I sit.

------

-- ----

Liketskes.

You sit.

---------

--- --- ----

Likes.

She (he or it) sits.

-------

---- ----

 

Where is the rest of the VERB? ÆLAH! Gotcha… Did you remember a previous statement that LIKETV is singular--it applies to one person or thing only. For practice, try your hand with "Lētketv." Remember that it also refers to one person or thing only "to run."

Lētkis.

I run.

------

-- ---

Lētketskes.

You run.

----------

--- --- ---

Lētkes.

She runs.

--------

---- ---

 

Generally, verbs of motion or movement in a direction have a separate word for their plural. We'll meet some of them in another lesson but not right now. Can you do "ayetv?"

There! You now have one of the most important PATTERNS in Mvskokē. It is to your strong advantage to memorize "OMETV" immediately. You will use it in each and every conversation you learn to have in Mvskokē.

Not only was that not hard for this author to write out for you, but it was easy for you, too, (after your fourth time through it). Of course, it does look strange to you because a different value is assigned to the letters of the Mvskokē alphabet than those of English. And, because it is a new and different way of using verbs, you aren't familiar with it. Cheer up, after a few study sessions with this model of common verb patterns, it'll become easy and predictable--you'll see!

Why stop now. In just a few minutes, we can double your beginning knowledge of Mvskokē verbs with one additional pattern. "Wanna see?" Then keep on going…

REMEMBER THESE?

Hecis.

I see.

Hecēs.

We see.

Hecetskes.

You see.

Hecatskes.

You all see.

Heces.

She sees.

Hecakes.

They see.

 

AND THESE?

Omis

I am

Omēs or Omēyes

we are

Ometskes

you are

Omatskes

you all are

Omes

is (she, he or it)

Omakes

they are

 

LETS ADD THEM TOGETHER AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS…

Hecet omis.

I am seeing.

 

Hecet ometskes.

You are seeing.

 

Hecet omes.

She (he or it) is seeing.

(or as Hecet os, Hecetos.)

 

 

 

Pohet omis.

I am hearing.

 

Pohet ometskes.

You are hearing.

 

Pohet omes.

He (she or it) is hearing.

(or as Pohet os, Pohetos.)

 

HECETV , HECET, HEC-

Hecis.

I see

 

Hecet omis.

I am seeing.

 

Hecetskes.

You see.

 

Hecet ometskes.

You are seeing.

 

Heces.

She (he or it) sees.

 

Hecet omes.

She is hearing.

(or as Hecet os, Hecetos)

POHETV, POHET, POH-

Pohis.

_______________

Pohet omis.

_______________

Pohetskes.

_______________

Pohet ometskes.

_______________

Pohes.

_______________

Pohet os.

_______________

 

AYETV, AYET, AY- (or, as VYETV, VYET, VY-)

Ayis. (Vyis.)

_______________

Vyet omis.

_______________

Vyetskes.

_______________

Ayet (or Vyet) ometskes.

_______________

Ayes or Vyes.

_______________

Vyet omes.

_______________

 

There you have it--your key to easily learned conversational Mvskokē.

This is a fine and healthy beginning for your language lessons. Check often for new materials if you're copying your lesson off the web page. Especially refer to the alphabet page for pronunciation help. Soon we hope "wave sound files" will be available on this site. Until then, continue to bring your cassette recorders to class. Mvto!

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